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Research Articles

Weed management in tea-recent developments

Author:

K. G. Prematilake

Tea Research Institute, Ratnapura, LK
About K. G.
Agronomy Division
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Abstract

Weeds compete with tea, reducing the yield. They also interrupt field operations. Managing weeds in tea plantations bas become a crucial issue due to high cost of labour and other inputs such as herbicides, especially at a time the end product fetches a lower NSA. Thus, a low cost weed management strategy is of paramount importance for the sustainable productivity of tea plantations. Adoption of cultural, and ecological methods is of great importance as they are environmental friendly and cost effective. They are land preparation, proper bush management, infilling, mulching, establishment of cover crops and green manure crops and leaving desirable weeds on ground. However, use of various herbicides has proven to be the most convenient and effective method and it could minimize soil erosion and eliminate loss of plant nutrients. Various herbicides have so far been recommended by the TRI for weed control in tea fields. There are number of problem weeds in tea fields at present as they are resistant to normal dosage of recommended herbicides. As such, these weeds have to be managed using specific herbicide dosages or cocktail mixtures or by adopting other control measures. For cost effective weed management strategies ensuring healthy growth of tea and good quality of made tea, safe and effective use of herbicides have been emphasized. The decision making on the adoption of aforesaid integrated weed management techniques more rational way would only be the solution for more cost-effective weed management and for healthy tea production.

How to Cite: Prematilake, K.G., 2003. Weed management in tea-recent developments. Tropical Agricultural Research and Extension, 6, pp.98–107. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/tare.v6i0.5447
Published on 30 Dec 2003.
Peer Reviewed

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